Hi.

Welcome to my blog. I document my adventures in travel, but also discuss history, folklore and films and books. Hope you have a nice stay!

Leechdoms, Wortcunning...

Leechdoms, Wortcunning...

And mostly because it absolutely delights me to no end to make people tilt their head -- this arrived today.  I've got a backlog of books I'm currently neck-deep in but I'm going to relish poring over this one.

From the insert:

This three volume work, published in 1864-6, was edited by Thomas Oswald Cockayne, a Cambridge graduate, much-published early member of the London Philological Society, and teacher of the philologists Walker Skeat and Henry Sweet. It is a collection of writings from pre-Conquest Britain on plants, medicine and the heavens, mostly in Old English with accompanying modern English translations.  Volume I begins with a substantial preface outlining the Anglo-Saxon reception of Greek and Latin medical texts.  The main work in this volume is an Old English version of the late Latin Herbarium formerly attributed to Apuleius, augmented by material deriving from Dioscorides'De Materia Medica. The volume concludes with an Old English translation of the fourth-century Roman physician Sextus Placitus' writings on animal-derived medicines, and some short medicinal recipes on Old English and Latin taken from the fly leaves of manuscripts.


Fantastic

Wharram Percy deserted medieval village

Wharram Percy deserted medieval village

Lough Key Forest Park, Ireland

Lough Key Forest Park, Ireland